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16 November 2012 ~

A big decision was taken at the special meeting of Premier League chairmen in London yesterday, called to discuss the effects of the new TV deal. They have decided to postpone any further discussion until February. Best league in the world at putting things off.

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Badge of the week ~ Slavoj Trebisov, Slovakia
Howl reader Thom Moyles has requested an interpretation of the Slavo Trebisov crest, as it appears to hold a profound but elusive meaning. Many years ago, in the fields surrounding the Slovakian town of Trebisov, there were fields of golden corn. The soil was rich and the land was one of plenty. Great was God's bounty in these burnished plains, if that's not pushing it a bit. The people were well fed and happy with their lot. Until one day a wise man, who had travelled through many lands, came to the town. He was greeted with enthusiasm by the townspeople and offered bread (they pretty much ate bread all day). The traveller, having eaten well of the bread and politely not asked if there might actually be something to have on it, settled back and began to tell a story.

He told of three ears of corn that grew in a valley. One corn was healthy and grew well – he was much admired by the other corns. The second corn lay somewhat in the shade and grew slowly, falteringly. The third corn was sewn in barren ground and grew not at all. After but nine full moons was the first corn fully grown. The farmer came out, cut it with a sharp knife and pummelled it into grain. The other two corns grew unnoticed in peace and comfort for the rest of their natural span.

The traveller finished his tale and rose as if to leave for his bed. He was stopped by the townspeople who demanded to know what his story meant. The traveller's last act on this earth was to smile knowingly and say: "It's symbolic." He was quickly torn to pieces by the enraged people. This fate befell many of the pioneers of symbolism around the world, as what people really wanted from a story was a recognisable plot and characters they could relate to. Slavoj Trebisov use this image to confuse and irritate the opposition, at least those without an NVQ in Agricultural Symbolism. Cameron Carter

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from Rob Dennis
"Tempting offer from Swindon Townonly £10 for four matches including one defeat. Bargain. No word if it will include coverage from the FA Cup run."

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from Steve Kay
"Occasionally newspapers deny that they make up the letters used in their problem pages. This one looks like evidence for the prosecution."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edgar Davids ensures that he won't be invited back on Goals on Sunday for a while.

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from Alex Brodie
"In Aaron Lennon's Wikipedia entry, I'm not sure how one paragraph links directly to the next."

 

 

 

 

 

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From the BBC Radio Lincolnshire coverage of their local team's FA Cup tie with Walsall. Goals are easy things to miss.

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How to describe Manchester Utd's comeback at Villa Park? Al Pacino provides some inspiration for the Mirror reporter, sort of.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Getting shirty Notable kits of yesteryear

Grays Athletic, FA Trophy final, 2006
The most successful period in Grays Athletic's history culminated in an FA Trophy win in 2006. The club had been bankrolled by chairman Mick Woodward since his arrival in 2000, and manager Mark Stimson built an impressive squad with young players that would become familiar names in League circles – Freddie Eastwood, Gary Hooper, Aaron McClean and Michael Kightly all played for the Gravelmen.

In 2005 Grays won the inaugural Conference South and the FA Trophy for the first time. The following season they initially took the Conference by storm, unbeaten in the first 15 games. With promotion to the Football League a realistic aspiration, they only finished third and then lost out in the play-offs. The silver lining was retaining the FA Trophy with a 2-0 win over Woking, cheered on at Upton Park by 8,000 of their own fans.

The shirt worn for the game was a specially embroidered one made by Nike. The sponsors were Hambrook & Greenstock, a Swiss-based financial company. In 2007 they were put into compulsory liquidation by the High Court after being found guilty of a land-selling scam. Around the same time, Grays' financial situation took a turn for the worse. Following the FA Trophy win Stimson moved to Stevenage and many of the star players left. Woodward reined in his spending and there followed a period of instability that saw six different managers in two seasons. They narrowly avoided relegation in 2007 and by the end of 2009-10 were homeless after their Recreation Ground was sold for housing. Facing a winding-up order for unpaid tax, the club resigned from the Conference. Grays started 2010-11 in Ryman League Division One North, where they remain. Andy Ollerenshaw

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