Euro 2008 team guide

What are the expectations for the team?
Thanks to the apparently golden touch of Guus Hiddink, probably greater than ever before. Russia teams of the past have generally managed to be less than the sum of their parts; Hiddink has managed to reverse that. The general feeling is that reaching the knockout stages would be a success. With a relatively tough group, Hiddink himself has tried to dampen any false hopes and said that his main target is the 2010 World Cup.

Is the coach popular?

He is now, although he has had to overcome the initial mistrust of those who said a foreigner would never get his head round the enigma that is Russian football. Along with his fellow Dutchman Dick Advocaat at Zenit St Petersburg, he seems to have cracked it.

Which players are good interviewees and who are the worst?
Andrei Arshavin and Vladislav Radimov, two of Advocaat’s players at Zenit, are always good value – friendly and open. At the other extreme, the grumpy and monosyllabic Sergei Ignashevich of CSKA Moscow is generally best avoided.

Are then any players with unusual hobbies or business interests?

Arshavin has a degree in fashion design, which included a thesis on “The development of sportswear manufacturing”. Alexei Smertin collects wine, and runs his own football academy in his native Barnaul in Siberia. He’s also obsessed with the works of John Fowles (author of The French Lieutenant’s Woman, among others), turning up at the novelist’s house in Dorset to introduce himself.

Do any of the players have famous girlfriends or wives?
There are no A-List celebrities, but plenty of wannabes. Four years ago, ahead of Euro 2004 a group of the players’ wives posed nude for a calendar. No word of a reprise this year though.

Will there be any rehearsed goal celebrations?
Unlikely. The Russians don’t go in for this kind of flamboyance. Don’t expect anything more exciting than some fist‑pumping.

Are there any players involved in politics?

Arshavin capitalised on his popularity as Russian football’s golden boy to gain election to the St Petersburg legislative assembly in 2006, campaigning on Vladimir Putin’s United Russia ticket.

What will the media coverage be like?

Sovietsky Sport and the estimable Sport Express will battle it out for the heavyweight coverage in print. The garrulous Andrei Kanchelskis, now general director at first division club FC Nosta (owned by Alisher Usmanov, who also owns just under 25 per cent of Arsenal), may pop up as a TV pundit.

Will there be many fans travelling to the tournament?

Not really. With the costs of getting and staying there beyond the average Russian, the travelling support tends to be restricted to the caviar sandwich eaters of the burgeoning business class, who can doubtless take the chance to check up on their Swiss bank accounts. Russian football song culture remains primitive and unimaginative, not least where the national team is concerned.

Dan Brennan

What are the expectations for the team?
Expectations remain reasonably low – a respectable group stage with qualification for the quarter-finals. Still, Greece’s amazing run in the qualifying tournament – ten wins out of 12 games, propelling them into eighth place in the FIFA rankings – has made everybody secretly wonder if lightning doesn’t really strike twice.

Are there any players who have appeared in TV commercials or other advertising?
Post-Euro 2004 super stardom opened the ad-money floodgates: Theo Zagorakis advertised bottled water (the aptly named Zagori water), Antonios Nikopolidis went for aluminium fittings, while coach Otto Rehhagel enlightened us on the benefits of eating processed meat products. Striker Angelos Charisteas probably landed the best deal, an orange juice commercial that was funny in a surprisingly self‑deprecating manner.

Is the coach popular?

Are you kidding? Last January Rehhagel was voted most popular man in Greece and that’s three-and-a-half years after he won Euro 2004. King Otto is not just popular, he’s untouchable. The news that he renewed his contract for another couple of years in March was greeted with universal enthusiasm.

Which players are good interviewees and who are the worst?

With 13 controversy-hungry daily sport papers in Athens alone, it’s not surprising that Greek footballers have perfected the art of speaking incessantly without actually saying anything. However, with Panathinaikos’s Ioannis Goumas and Georgios Karagounis, one tends to wonder if that effect is really produced on purpose. Not surprisingly, exiled Greeks are more interesting, albeit in a grumpy sort of way. Benfica’s Kostas Katsouranis has consistently produced the best quotes.

Will there be any rehearsed goal celebrations?
Actually the question is whether there will be any goals to celebrate at all. The Greek team is so defence-oriented that I suspect King Otto has explicitly forbidden any celebration rehearsals lest they give his players ideas. Hopefully, Karagounis will make up with his headless-chicken goal-celebration routine.

Are there any players involved in politics?

With Greek politics tinted, from one end of the spectrum to the other, by aggressive nationalism, it’s just as well that the footballers have so far kept their political views to themselves. Expect the odd “Macedonia is Greek” banner on the terraces, though.

What will be the media coverage be like ?

State TV, who hold the exclusive rights for the tournament, have not yet revealed their plans for Euro 2008, but we have every reason to believe they will, as always, adhere strictly to the Ceausescu school of objective reporting. Irrespective of whether they employ former players as auxiliary propagandists or not, hysterical jingoism will make up for poor journalism.

Will there be many fans travelling to the tournament?

Four years ago in Portugal, the team drew very impressive numbers of travelling fans and the same is expected to happen in Austria. The majority will travel from Greece, though the stupid wig-wearing, toga-clad, face-painted contingent will most probably hail from the diaspora centres of Germany. Ninety per cent of the songs date back to Euro 2004 and they’re so explicit in their celebration of the Greek male’s sexual prowess they will be ignored by TV commentators.

Paul Pomonis

What are the expectations for the team?
Most Swedes expect the team to get out of the group.

Are there any players who have appeared in TV commercials?

Fredrik Ljungberg, of course, was the face and body of Calvin Klein underwear for over two years and is now in a Pepsi advert with Ronaldinho, Frank Lampard and Lionel Messi. Anders Svensson is nicknamed Taco-Anders by opposing fans in the Allsvenskan after being in an advert for a company selling pizza, while Zlatan Ibrahimovic is now one of Nike’s hottest properties. It is a far cry from the start of his career when he was the face of Garnier Fructis, with the slogan: “You don’t think Zlatan has dandruff, do you?”

Is the coach popular?

Lars Lagerbäck is quite popular because he has taken Sweden to five consecutive major championships but is often criticised for the team’s negative approach. Remarkable, really, considering his achievements.

Which players are good interviewees and who are the worst?

Any journalist getting more than monosyllabic replies from Tobias Linderoth will have done really well. Mikael Nilsson is quite good and Ibrahimovic can be superb or awful depending on what mood he is in.

Do any of the players have famous girlfriends or wives?
Christian Wilhelmsson’s girlfriend, Oksana Andersson, is the most famous face at the moment. The Russian-Swedish model writes a blog about the couple’s life in Spain (he is on loan at Deportivo La Coruña) and has attracted a cult following (not necessarily because it is that good; one recent headline was “how nice it is with newly washed clothes”).

Are there any players involved in politics?
Not noticeably, but the current assistant coach, Roland Andersson, protested vehemently against the Argentinian junta before the 1978 World Cup. He threatened not to go to the tournament but in the end went and filmed everything he could concerning the regime.

What will be the media coverage be like?

Swedish Channel 4 has got the rights and their pundits are normally Magnus Hedman (ex-Coventry City) and Pontus Kåmark (ex-Leicester City). They are both good and professional – but nowhere near as popular as the former Sweden international Glenn Strömberg, who works for state channel SVT and will not be commentating on games this time around. The best newspaper columnist is, without a doubt, Aftonbladet’s Simon Bank.

Will there be many fans travelling to the tournament?

Loads of fans will travel, around 30,000 at the latest estimates. Sweden were voted Fans of the Tournament at the 2006 World Cup with the highlight being 55,000 Swedes in the Olympic Stadium in Berlin. 170,000 people applied for tickets. The two most popular songs are Vi är svenska fans allihopa (We are Swedish fans all of us) and In med bollen i mål (Put the ball in the goal).

Marcus Christenson

What are the expectations for the team?
Quarter-finals and then home. The usual.

Are there any players who have appeared in TV commercials or other advertising?
Square-jawed goalie Iker Casillas, whose preppy, school-prefect appearance never fails to attract the advertising companies, inevitably appears in some hands-related TV spots when a major competition looms. He has just insured his hands for €7.5m and the insurers, Groupama, have been quick to get out an ad in which he puts on the light with his nose, opens the door with his head, etcetera.

Which players are good interviewees and who are the worst?
Cesc Fábregas is marginally more tedious to listen to in English than in Spanish, which might have something to do with the fact that neither is his native language; Xabi Alonso comes over in all three of his languages as someone determined to avoid the prepackaged response; and Valencia’s David Villa is a straight talker, unusually frank and unafraid of upsetting the sponsors. Barça’s Carles Puyol has improved his diction over the years, but is still incapable of finishing a sentence without the word “no”.

Is the coach popular?

That depends on whether you are pro-Madrid or anti-Madrid. Those in favour of Raúl being excluded from the national side tend to be Catalans, Basques and any other awkward region who fail to buy in to the Iberian idea – and they have no problem with Luis Aragonés, despite his obvious madness. Those in favour of Raúl’s inclusion think that Aragonés is not only mad but the devil incarnate. And when all the noise dies down, Spain have managed to attain fourth place  in the FIFA rankings and 16 games undefeated without Raúl, which probably says something for Aragonés’s decision.

Are there any players with unusual hobbies or business interests?
Real Madrid’s Sergio Ramos is rumoured to be signing a deal with fashion house Dolce & Gabbana. Puyol still effects a pre-match psyche‑up routine using a potent mix of the Ramones and Napalm Death, whereas Liverpool’s Pepe Reina likes jewellery, Bang & Olufsen systems and grey Porsche Cayennes, all of which were nicked from his house while he was saving penalties against Chelsea in last year’s Champions League semi-final.

Will there be any rehearsed goal celebrations?

The squad is currently practising the complex mime sequence required by Swing Low Sweet Chariot. This is in acknowledgement of the Sky Sports campaign to encourage English subscribers to support Spain for the duration. The sport tabloid Marca, bemused by Sky’s initiative, remarked: “Why don’t the English support Croatia? It was they, after all, who did England the favour of showing them how crap they are.”

What will TV coverage be like?

Cable channels La Cuatro and Digital Plus have won the rights battle, which means that the non-subscribing public will be spared the idiosyncrasies of La Sexta’s Julio Salinas (ex-Barça) and the incomprehensible Kike, once of Atlético Madrid. Instead, so the rumour goes, Raúl has been signed up by La Cuatro – which should guarantee that everyone signs up to Digital Plus, featuring the indomitable Michael Robinson, who remains a cult figure in Spain.

Will there be many fans travelling to the tournament?

There was a national competition recently to supply lyrics for Spain’s wordless national anthem, the winner of which starts: “Long Live Spain! Let us all sing together with different voices.” You can’t quite see that one attracting the Catalan camp (whose minister of culture, incidentally, dismissed the song as “drivel”) or the travelling diehards, who are instead working on a version of Spain’s satirical entry for Eurovision 2008 in May, Baila el Chiki Chiki – a catchy ditty which stands much more chance of winning a trophy than does the national squad. According to his website, the legendary drummer Manolo will be going, of course, although last time he travelled to Germany his bar/museum in Valencia was ransacked.

Phil Ball

What are the expectations for the team?
The French public are pessimistic. Which is a good indicator that they’ll get to the final at least, previous low expectations having been recorded in 1998 and 2006. Ten years on, four players from the 1998 World Cup squad – Patrick Vieira, Lilian Thuram, David Trezeguet and Thierry Henry – could all take part. If picked, Nicolas Anelka, another player from 1998 generation, will be looking to score his first goal in a major international competition. There is some optimism surrounding the new generation represented by Hatem Ben Arfa, Samir Nasri and Karim Benzema – all three tipped as the next Zidane – as well as “Kaiser Franck” Ribéry.

What are the expectations for the team?
Very low, ever since the draw was made and they got the hardest opponents in the other three pots. Nobody really expects them to get past the first round, although the media are trying to big-up their chances. A recent 3-0 friendly win over Russia has fed this nascent “we could do it” hype.

Are there any players who have appeared in TV commercials or other advertising?

Adi Mutu has become so ubiquitously Beckhamesque that it is more which products can hitch themselves to the Mutu brand rather than the other way around. After his coke bust (when, ironically, he was the Romanian face of Pepsi) he vanished temporarily, but his subsequent rehabilitation at Fiorentina has seen him return to seemingly all billboards and TV screens. The rest of the squad appear, en masse, in a beer commercial and that’s about their lot.

Is the coach popular?
Yes, with reservations. Having got them to the finals, Victor Piturca’s position is fairly strong, but there are doubters who question the style of play. Three crushing defeats could see him gone.  

Which players are good interviewees and who are the worst?

Cosmin Contra is pretty good. Mutu and Cristian Chivu are well practised in the modern footballing art of being bland yet doing so in a seemingly friendly way. The players who have never played outside Romania are the ones who could go either way – the amusing emotional outburst or the nonsensical ramble.

Will there be any rehearsed goal celebrations?

I think most people would be elated if the team just managed to score a goal.  The team included. I expect a joyful bundle by the corner flag rather than anything more choreographed. Unless it’s Mutu, who doesn’t really seem to get on with the rest of the team and looks down on them somewhat (in which case there will be a joyful bundle of all the other players while Adi runs around seeking out the cameras).

Are there any players involved in politics?
Not as yet, but many old pros and various members of the higher echelons of Romanian football are mostly, it seems, on the far right. So the longer this bunch stay out the better.

What will be the media coverage be like?

Gheorghe Hagi will be interviewed at every opportunity, but he hasn’t yet been snapped up by any one TV station. Horia Ivanovici, presenter of the popular Fanatik show, was recently taken to court by Piturca for demanding large sums of money to go easy on him on his popular TV show. Piturca was backed up by various others including Chivu, who said that ever since refusing to pay off Ivanovici while still at Ajax, he’s consistently been slammed on the show.  

Will there be many fans travelling to the tournament?

Romania’s current economic boom, its accession to the EU (meaning easier travel) and the fact that this tournament is relatively close means that there will be a fair few travelling fans, probably more than there ever have been following Romania at a major tournament before. The chants are Mooooooooo-Toooooooo.

Andy Hockley

What are the expectations for the team?
After being drawn in a group containing both 2006 World Cup finalists, the expectations are not high, especially after some shaky qualifying performances, such as a single-goal victory over Luxembourg and a collapse against Belarus in Minsk at the end of 2007. However, the national team have survived the first round of every European Championship since Marco van Basten, Ruud Gullit and Co won the title in 1988 so there is always the possibility of another penalty shootout defeat in the quarter- or semifinals.

Have any players appeared in commercials or any other adverts?

Edwin van der Sar features in a commercial for healthy mints, in which he stops penalties taken by Bad Breath, Tooth Slice and Coffee Stain. The revenues may go to a good cause.

Is the coach popular?

Not really. Van Basten’s preference for Ajax reserves is suspect, while the way he stubbornly clung on to the two-winger system when there wasn’t a recognised one in the squad was a bit strange – but players have recently talked him out of that. However, every Dutch national coach suffers from the nation’s expectation of being entertained. Winning is not good enough, we want “dream football”, too.

Are there any players with unusual hobbies or business interests?

Clarence Seedorf is the owner of a 125cc Moto GP team. He has also founded the Clarence Seedorf Stadium in Paramaribo and aims to lead Surinam to the World Cup. The Netherlands Antilles also hope to dip into the talent pool of black players in the Eredivisie, which may affect the Dutch national team in the future.

What will the media coverage be like?

There is a tendency to use coaches as pundits. “This would never happen against any team of mine” is always a subtext of their comments. Louis van Gaal quit during the qualifying tournament, saying he had pointed out the same mistakes in the team tactics over and over again and felt he was repeating himself. However, it is very difficult for Van Gaal to keep his opinions to himself, so when asked, he will surely turn up somewhere on the telly. As will Johan Cruyff who was simultaneously a TV pundit and an advisor to Van Basten during the 2006 World Cup. After the bad-tempered loss to Portugal in the last 16, Cruyff defended Van Basten in his newspaper column the next day and blamed the defeat on government minister Rita Verdonk, who had refused to give Salomon Kalou a Dutch passport.

Will there be many fans travelling to the tournament?

Most Dutch tickets are taken by sponsors, the biggest one an insurance company, who use them to reward their agents and employees. It is a new form of hooliganism. At the 2006 World Cup there were frightening stories of unsuspecting foreign fans isolated in pub corners by men dressed in orange who bombarded them with stories about life insurance, investment plans and favourable loan rates.

Ernst Bouwes

What are the expectations for the team?
As world champions, Italy are expected to do very well, but a huge question mark hangs over coach Roberto Donadoni, who has done well so far but has little support from the Italian federation. His job security has not been helped by leaving out Alessandro Del Piero, who still has many supporters among the media and has been playing brilliantly for Juventus. Failure to survive a tough group would mean the end for Donadoni, but he may go in any case, unless he wins the whole thing.

Are there any players who have appeared in TV commercials or other advertising?

Rino Gattuso has been starring in ads for Vodafone, most of them alongside Francesco Totti. His strong southern accent casts him as a wily regional character with national appeal, which also helped him get a role in promoting – tongue-in-cheek, as he does not pass as the most erudite person – an encyclopedia. Andrea Pirlo, Marco Materazzi and Daniele De Rossi appeared in an ad for bank giants Unicredit, in which someone in the street looks in their general direction, does a double take, then walks past them to greet three other men in a table behind them with the words: “Hey, I know you, you work for Unicredit!” When the man nods towards the three footballers’ table, pointing his finger at the three bank workers and adding “See, what a team!”, Pirlo stands up in anger but is restrained by his fellow Azzurri.

Which players are good interviewees and who are the worst?

Fabio Cannavaro, as captain, is as close to an official spokesman for the team as there could be, but he doesn’t say much. Gigi Buffon can be blunt and dour at the same time but will never be short of things to say, while Gattuso’s sincerity in calling out those who do not appear to be willing to pull their weight, as he sometimes does for Milan, may also be something you’d like to listen to.

Do any of the players have famous girlfriends or wives?

Buffon’s girlfriend, Alena Seredova, is a Czech model and a TV personality of the kind you’ll see on Italian football shows for no specific reason other than her good looks – while Luca Toni’s is model Marta Cecchetto, no celebrityseeker as they met while he was an unknown lower-division player. Players’ wives and girlfriends are often in the papers and gossip magazines but they have never reached WAG level, although it was said the number of hangers-on and players’ families who were allowed into the team hotel at Euro 2004 in Portugal contributed to the general failure of that side.

What will the media coverage be like?

Sky Italy have bought the rights to the Euro 2008 but RAI, the state-owned television company, will show selected matches, including probably those involving Italy. RAI has become something of an audition stage for coaches in search of a job: Fabio Capello, who has returned as a pundit a decade after he first appeared, provides sharp, insightful comment in between England duties. Generally speaking, Sky, who count Marcello Lippi, Paolo Rossi, Gianluca Vialli and Luca Marchegiani among their contributors, provide much better coverage, if typically over-hyped (Lippi, with a World Cup under his belt, says “there’s nothing like the Champions League” in one of Sky’s ads, for example). Newspapers will typically send two or more reporters to cover every sneeze and breath of the Azzurri and perhaps assign a couple or more to other groups. Coverage and interest would dramatically drop if Italy fail to progress, though.

Will there be many fans travelling to the tournament?
Italy are sure to be among the best supported sides especially in Switzerland. Not only do many Italians live there, but it takes only a few hours to drive from northern Italy to Zurich and Bern, where the Azzurri will play their first-round matches. But there is only a small hardcore group of fans who try to travel everywhere, the rest are just spur-of-the-moment supporters. The Azzurri only enjoy great support when they start winning, but do not be fooled by the TV shots of people cruising the streets on mopeds or cars or jumping into fountains: the average Italy match raises few eyebrows.

Roberto Gotta

What are the expectations for the team?
At the peak of a huge match-fixing and corruption scandal, the national team are seen as the last bastion of honour for Polish football. High hopes were dashed after a recent friendly 30 drubbing at home to the United States and nobody is building their hopes up after the last two disastrous World Cups. Especially considering that we are in a strong group. People may be hoping for floodlight failure as happened during the qualifying game against Kazakhstan – our boys scored three goals straight after the lights came back on. Those at the Polish FA who are currently undergoing a match-fixing investigation categorically have done nothing wrong.

Are there any players who have appeared in TV commercials or other advertising?

Artur Boruc used to advertise McDonald’s and he looks increasingly like he believed what he said in those ads. Coach Leo Beenhakker appears in a Tyskie beer ad where he says: “You’ve got talented people in Poland like in every other country.” It was met with disbelief and analysed more than a zillion times. What if it’s actually true? There must be something in what a man who earns €50,000 a month says.
 
Is the coach popular?
Beenhakker is far more popular than all the players put together. His name is constantly sung during games. He is revered as a sorcerer who has found a way to inspire the often very average players from a weak Polish league. Not only have results improved, but the national team developed their own style for the first time since the 1980s. There are malicious rumours that it’s all down to his interpreter, the former Celtic favourite Jacki Dziekanowski, who apparently says the complete opposite to what Leo means.

Which players are good interviewees and who are the worst?

The Holland-born Ebi Smolarek, when in a mood to speak Polish in an understandable way, has often got something interesting to say. Boruc is a straight talker – after making some amazing saves against Germany during last World Cup he didn’t want any praise at all. All he had to say for himself was that he was just lucky to be hit by the ball. At the other end of the spectrum you will find Ireneusz Jele of Auxerre, who is an interview disaster, his gems including: “We lost because the opponents were more fasterer.”

Are then any players with unusual hobbies or business interests?
Jacek Bak is an enthusiastic skier. Boruc says he wants to travel to away games with Legia Warsaw fans after retiring. Young forward Kamil Grosicki has been treated for gambling addiction.

Will there be any rehearsed goal celebrations?

Does picking the ball out of your own net to restart a game as quickly as possible count?

Are there any players involved in politics?

A good result against the Germans would make Leo a serious candidate for president.

What will the media coverage be like?

Famous former goalkeeper Jan Tomaszewski will certainly have lots to say, but it will be inversely proportional to any sense conveyed. Former national coach Jacek Gmoch will be a close runner-up. His numerous slip-ups and fiendish laughter have earned him cult status, as has his legendary inability to understand the away-goals rule.

Will there be many fans travelling to the tournament?
We were one of the better supported teams during the Euro qualifiers with many exiles travelling from the UK and Ireland. But in a typical piece of cronyism the PZPN (the FA) distributed almost all the finals tickets among the so-called “Polish football family”, leaving only about 2,000 tickets per game for genuine supporters.

Maciej Slominski

What are the expectations for the team?
Expectations are pretty low with Austria for the first time not being listed in the top 100 of the FIFA rankings, below such teams as New Zealand and The Gambia. But the last game against the Netherlands has brought back some hope – Austria took a three-goal lead in the first half, although they did lose 4-3. Of course, when the Euro 2008 euphoria starts all the bad results of recent years will be forgotten. But with opponents such as Germany and Croatia euphoria may not be enough.

Are there any players who have appeared in TV commercials or other advertising?

Our captain Andreas Ivanschitz has been busy flogging LG television sets and the whole team like to eat at McDonald’s, which may offer a clue to their recent performances.

Is the coach popular?
Not that I know of. But Josef Hickersberger has proven that he can absorb a lot of criticism without needing counselling and has therefore has earned some respect among the fans and journalists. Hickersberger was also Teamchef for Austria’s worst ever result, the 1-0 defeat against the Faroe Islands in 1990. He knows that only a successful European Championship – that is, getting to the knockout stages – can help the nation to forget this embarrassment.

Which players are good interviewees and who are the worst?

Striker Roland Linz can be a difficult character but at least he shows a sense of humour. Goalkeeper Alex Manninger can also be entertaining, albeit unintentionally due to the hyper way he tends to behave in post-match interviews.

Are then any players with unusual hobbies or business interests?
In general the team is very young and the unspectacular hobbies range from snowboarding to going to cinema and eating popcorn. Defender Johnny Ertl plays guitar in a Rock band called Ohne Lizenz, which could be translated as “Without concession”, and goalkeeper Jürgen Macho – now with AEK Athens – used to be a member of the diehard supporters’ group Rapid Ultras in his early days in Vienna.

Do any of the players have famous girlfriends or wives?
Roland Linz used to be involved with an international swimmer, Fabienne Nadarajah – but that is a thing of the past. Why should famous women want to be connected with unknown footballers?

Will there be any rehearsed goal celebrations?

Last year Austria scored only seven times in 12 matches. There are no discussions about how best to celebrate goals.

Will any former players be involved in media coverage?

Players from the World Cups of 1978 and 1998 such as Hans Krankl and Toni Polster are doomed to spend the rest of their lives ranting about how they would take the national team to new heights if only someone would let them. But Krankl has already had his chance. One exception is Krankl’s contemporary, Herbert Prohaska, an Austria Vienna legend who also played in Italy. He analyses matches for the national channel ORF and – despite or even because of some linguistic problems – has somehow managed to become a national treasure.

Do Austrian fans have any favourite chants or songs?
Yes, but they are rather boring. Immer wieder Oesterreich (Forever Austria) is probably the best known. Try the league for much better chants.

Stefan Kraft

Sign up to the WSC Weekly Howl - a small portion of despair and enlightenment delivered to your inbox every Friday