WSC Logo

rss

Sign up for the WSC Weekly Howl

A small portion of despair and enlightenment delivered to your inbox every Friday

 

First name
Surname
Email

newissue medrec 331

gplus50

footballartbanner1



Welcome, Guest
Do people still speak like that?
(1 viewing) (1) Guest

TOPIC: Do people still speak like that?

  • Reed John
  • Settle down, Beavis.
  • Posts: 15895
posted 02-06-2012 13:01
Who is Carole Bayer Sager?
  • Reed John
  • Settle down, Beavis.
  • Posts: 15895
posted 02-06-2012 13:18
Reed John wrote:
Who is Carole Bayer Sager?


This is a fantastic overview of American accents and how they are often misapplied on tv and film:
tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/AmericanAccents

It never occurred to me tha the military has its own accent, but I guess it does.
posted 02-06-2012 13:36
Carole Bayer Sager.

Before your time, Reed.
posted 02-06-2012 14:00
From The link here 's Middlesbrough page - which I can't listen to, as my browser's not letting me install Realplayer 10.5.

It's perhaps not widely known, but Middlesbrough has the second highest Irish population in England after Liverpool and this has clearly had an impact on speech there and this unique combination of features makes the Middlesbrough accent extremely distinctive.


Kiss me, I'm Irish! Swear down, top o'the fucken mornin' t'yer, yer daft cunts.

I'm really quite surprised at that - as I said, I knew we had a big Irish lineage, but that's absolutely crackers. In fact, I'm not sure I believe it.
  • Femme Folle
  • "Live every day, people. Live every fucking day."
  • Posts: 5755
posted 02-06-2012 20:29
When I lived in the South, I could always tell where another Southerner was from by their accent. Texas was very different from South Carolina, Georgia was nothing like north Louisiana, etc. Now that I've lived away from there for so many years, I honestly couldn't tell which state someone was from based on their accent.

But it still bothers me when I watch films set in the South--especially those set in my home state. They hardly ever get the accents right.

Right now, the only regional accents I hear (that I can identify) are eastern Massachusetts, western New York state, south Jersey/eastern Pennsylvania and NYC metro. And Maryland.

I think my own accent is a jumble of Louisiana, Boston, NYC and general American. No one around here is ever able to guess where I am from. I like that.
posted 02-06-2012 22:25
My in laws are Blackburn born and bred and my father in law and brother in law in particular have very strong Blackburn accents. The strange thing is, the Blackburn accent to me sounds almost identical to a west country accent.


I get accused of being from Birmingham fairly regularly. It must be my Lancashire accent coming through.
  • WOM
  • Going to call for the transcript.
  • Posts: 19246
posted 02-06-2012 22:28
I don't have an accent. I'm local.
  • Wyatt Earp
  • This whole imbroglio is epiphenomenal
  • Posts: 23259
posted 03-06-2012 00:12
Jesus, listen to those Shetlanders.
posted 08-11-2012 23:34
A few interesting posts from an amateur linguist's blog, speculating that there is a new non-rhotic accent developing among hipsters and young people in an area of LA:

thewritersamhuddy.wordpress.com/2012/10/...becoming-non-rhotic/

www.lataco.com/taco/nela-hipster-accent

He also writes about Pasadena's specific accent:

thewritersamhuddy.wordpress.com/2012/11/...e-sound-of-pasadena/
  • Pat McGatt
  • The very famous sports reporter
  • Posts: 1483
posted 11-11-2012 16:07
There are certain common patterns across the North of England and the Scots Lowlands. You don't need to look for an Irish link, especially as those patterns you seem to see are not even coincident with the largest Irish populations. Occam's razor, and all that...

By the way, that TV Tropes page is fascinating. the first time I found it I was stuck there for hours.
Last Edit: 11-11-2012 16:09:09 by Pat McGatt.
posted 11-11-2012 16:17
sw2boropetrovsk wrote:
From The link here 's Middlesbrough page - which I can't listen to, as my browser's not letting me install Realplayer 10.5.

It's perhaps not widely known, but Middlesbrough has the second highest Irish population in England after Liverpool and this has clearly had an impact on speech there and this unique combination of features makes the Middlesbrough accent extremely distinctive.


Kiss me, I'm Irish! Swear down, top o'the fucken mornin' t'yer, yer daft cunts.

I'm really quite surprised at that - as I said, I knew we had a big Irish lineage, but that's absolutely crackers. In fact, I'm not sure I believe it.


Indeed. The idea that there are more Irish in Middlesbrough than in, say, London or Manchester is blatantly absolute bullshit.
posted 11-11-2012 19:24
Well, it's obviously rubbish if it's suggesting in absolute terms. Maybe not if we're talking proportionally.

Plus, what with us being an immigrant place, it's possible that people gave up their immigrant identity more easily than other places, and identified as part of the new.

Interesting .pdf

By comparison the proportion of people in the study area* who have Irish names is ten times greater
than the proportion of people who describe themselves as Irish. This compares with a national average of
three times. The study area therefore is a place where most of the descendants of Irish immigrants would
no longer describe themselves as Irish.


*The Middlesbrough and Middlesbrough South constituencies, which contains a lot of East Cleveland pityackers and misses out loads of urban Teessiders in East Middlesbrough that gets lumped in with Redcar. Although apparently they are all Cornish out there, which explains a lot. Apparently Lingdale has more Corns than Plymouth. Blimey.

This slideshow has that thing about Middlesbrough being the number two Irish place as well, but not really sure for the basis of the claim. It states 1 in 5 of us are Irish, mind.
posted 11-11-2012 19:25
When I used to do a lot of work in the Boro area I noticed it had a shitload of Catholic schools so I took it from that that the area had a largish Irish diaspora.
posted 13-11-2012 15:01
Incandenza wrote:
A few interesting posts from an amateur linguist's blog, speculating that there is a new non-rhotic accent developing among hipsters and young people in an area of LA:

thewritersamhuddy.wordpress.com/2012/10/...becoming-non-rhotic/

www.lataco.com/taco/nela-hipster-accent

He also writes about Pasadena's specific accent:

thewritersamhuddy.wordpress.com/2012/11/...e-sound-of-pasadena/


This is cool. It's nice to see hyperlocal studies of accents, given that linguists have sometimes tried to paint with too broad of a brush.

Every New Yorker I've ever met thinks that Long Islanders, people from different boroughs and people from eastern NJ all speak differently, but many linguists will tell you they're the same.

Native San Franciscans will empathize.
  • Renart
  • Texas vexes and perplexes
  • Posts: 6940
posted 13-11-2012 15:11
It gets hard to distinguish between personal speech quirks and community ones the more "micro" you go, I'd imagine. I feel like there is a difference between Long Island and New Jersey accents, but I wouldn't want to put money on being able to distinguish between them.

As we already talked about, there definitely was a San Francisco accent at one time, but it seems to have died out for the most part. Though of course a new one might be emerging.
posted 13-11-2012 15:31
The LA thing is especially interesting, because there have been people here who believe that the Long Island/New Jersey accents are increasingly influenced by "Valley Girl" (and, indeed, that there is some evidence of "Mallspeak" throughout the country).

That said, his assertion that people in San Francisco sound more like Philly or Baltimore has left me scratching my head. The Baltimore accent in particular is quite distinctive, and nothing like what people sound like in SF.
  • Renart
  • Texas vexes and perplexes
  • Posts: 6940
posted 13-11-2012 15:34
Philly, maybe, since that often sounds (to me) like a sort of unplaceable Northeastern accent. But Baltimore always makes me think of those rounded vowels, which you never hear outside of that region stretching from the mid-Atlantic toward Pittsburgh and parts of Appalachia.
posted 13-11-2012 18:14
I'm guessing Philly and Baltimore are his idea of "East Coast accents that aren't as obvious as New York or Boston".

The San Francisco accent definitely still exists - I have it - but, being blunt, you gotta be white. It's similar to Boston, New York, Philly, and New Orleans in the sense that it's the sound you get when you stuck Irish, Italians, Germans, a handful of Eastern Europeans, all Catholics, and some Jews and blacks. You adjust the ratios a bit - SF's rather light on Jews, for example - but they all sound like they come from the same family.

I'm not sure where the Chinese community (much less the Latino community) comes into this, but I sound more like Angela Alioto than Cher Horowitz.

Interestingly a lot of Asian friends I know, most of whom are first or second generation immigrants, sound way more "Valley".

Edit: You know what SF sounds like? People from the larger towns of southern Connecticut. A lot of people think my parents are natives, and southern CT has exactly that mix I described above.
Last Edit: 13-11-2012 18:17:18 by Flynnie.
  • Renart
  • Texas vexes and perplexes
  • Posts: 6940
posted 13-11-2012 18:19
Flynnie wrote:
The San Francisco accent definitely still exists - I have it - but, being blunt, you gotta be white.


That's true to some extent, though, in most cities with regional accents. The African-American accent in New York or Philly or Baltimore is distinct from the white ethnic accent, and generally closer to the Southern accent, both white and black. Black neighborhoods in New York were the only ones I could use "y'all" without getting a funny look.

When I said the San Francisco accent had died out, I meant among younger people. Though maybe I'm wrong. The guy I knew that had it the strongest was an Italian-American colleague of my dad's who grew up in North Beach.
posted 13-11-2012 18:42
Ask him if he knows Don Russo, the Mare of North Beach.

The difficulty among young people is that there are very few young native San Franciscans of any race, much less young white natives who have multi-generation roots in the City or had the proper exposure to it as kids to pick it up like I did*.

But those who qualify do tend to have it. I doubt it's as pronounced as somebody like Joe DiMaggio or Joe Cronin, but it's definitely not stereotypically Californian.

* My nan, who is not related to me but is in effect my grandma, is Irish. Her kids sound like Irish Angela Aliotos, live in a huge house in the Castro and know everybody. I went to a little Catholic school in Noe Valley that drew very heavily from the surrounding area and about 2/3rds of the students were Irish, with the rest being Italian or German. It was the ideal incubation for producing an accent like mine.
Last Edit: 13-11-2012 18:43:40 by Flynnie.
Time to create page: 0.27 seconds

 

© When Saturday Comes Limited 2014 | Contact | Privacy & cookies | Sitemap | Managed hosting by Latitude